Livelihood

Our Goal

28 out of 100 Filipinos are currently living below the poverty line and majority of the poor are in rural areas. Farmers and fisher folk remain the lowest paid workers in the country, making it extremely difficult for them to support their families.

To help the poorest of the poor families in the Philippines to meet their needs, holistic and effective economic development programs are essential. The entrepreneurial poor needs resources and technical support to have access to food, education, health care.

World Vision offers the necessary training and tools for families to provide the basic needs of their children.

 

Livelihood

In 2016, World Vision reached 100,437 beneficiaries through numerous economic development initiatives.

How do we enable families to support themselves?

Livelihood for every family in a community means increase income that translates to food, education, health care, and asset creation.

Our work includes increasing the capacities of families so that they can support the basic needs of their children in the long term.

Livelihood
We help increase productivity on agri-fishery by promoting natural farming
Livelihood
We invest in the economic resilience of parents and caregivers by providing financial trainings
Livelihood
We support increased engagement of producers to markets, service providers and relevant stakeholders

How do we enable families to support themselves?

  • Community Managed Savings and Credit Association (CoMSCA) builds the economic resilience and financial literacy of households through the mobilization of self-help mechanisms on savings and credit services.
  • Natural Farming System promotes increase in farm productivity by being anchored on natural ways to care for the soil and crops.
  • Local Value Chain Development links farmers and producers to markets by closely collaborating with market players supporting enterprises and industries.
Help Provide Training and Assistance to Filipino Families

Testimonials

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“Every time I get a letter from the children, natutuwa ako kasi I see their progress. I don’t want them to miss their right to education just because of poverty. I promised that for each achievement I get, I will celebrate by adding more sponsored children. For my fellow OFWs, it is never too late to help. We are given the privilege to earn more. Maybe that “more” is given to you because you are asked to share them with others. A blessing is not a blessing unless you share it.”

-Joanne Rico, World Vision child sponsor

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“One thing that really made me committed [to my sponsored children] is knowing that God does not change His mind when He blesses me, so if He is consistent, what is stopping me from being the same? No one has ever become poor by sharing and giving. I have always felt that I have more than enough and the little amount I can share with a child or two would certainly make a big difference in their lives.”

-Melizza Guiao, World Vision child sponsor

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“I prayed to God to let me be an instrument of love. It really matters that we give what we have and that we support children, their families and communities; that we do not give up on their dreams. Iba ‘yung tumulong tayo sa hindi natin kakilala kasi alam natin na it’s the goodness of the Lord leading us to help these people.”

-Florian Torres, World Vision child sponsor

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“I needed to think less of myself and see where I could give. We always complain about certain things we aren’t happy about in the Philippines. Education for everyone is really something that I can contribute to and not just complain about. It’s my responsibility as a citizen of the Philippines, as a Christian, to share, to return what I feel God has blessed me with or what I feel that my country has given me. The most fulfilling for me would be the times I got a letter from my child. Actually the first time I got a letter, I cried. I was surprised by the emotion it brought out in me.”

-Elyse Pilapil, World Vision child sponsor