Three Months On: World Vision assisted 64,000 people affected by typhoons Rolly and Ulysses

 

Three months since typhoons Rolly (international name Goni) and Ulysses (international name Vamco) ravaged Luzon, World Vision in the Philippines continues its emergency response in partnership with the local government and like-minded agencies to help families bounce back from the succeeding calamities. To date, World Vision has reached over 64,000 people, including 23,000 children.

“Our timely intervention in the Bicol Region, Metro Manila, Isabela and Cagayan provinces has helped children, who are at the heart of what we do, to cope from the impact of typhoons Rolly and Ulysses,” shared Rommel V. Fuerte, World Vision national director who recently visited and witnessed the situation of affected families in Albay.

Emergency essentials provided to affected families include food, hygiene kits, water containers, kitchen sets, emergency shelter kits and other non-food items for protection like blanket, mosquito nets and plastic mats.

Recognizing the need of the most vulnerable especially mothers and babies, UNFPA, the United Nations Population Fund in the Philippines and World Vision provided for the needs of pregnant and lactating mothers through cash assistance, maternity and dignity kits. In Catanduanes, where the typhoon damaged a number of rural health units (RHU), an emergency maternity treatment facility (EMTF) which serves as a temporary birthing clinic, and tents for women-friendly spaces were set up. Generator sets were also provided.

“We are thankful for your prompt support. You were there right after the typhoon. There is a huge need not only because of COVID-19. Our basic emergency obstetric and newborn care (bEmONC) was badly affected [by the typhoon] so the EMTF and generator sets will help us continue our services forpregnant women. This also boosts the morale of the community, knowing that they are not left behind,” said Dr. Elva M. Joson, health officer of Virac, Catanduanes.

Early Recovery

Meanwhile, World Vision now shifts from relief to early recovery interventions. With funding from the European Union Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO), teams on ground commenced distribution of shelter repair kits containing GI sheets, marine plywood, hammer, saw, sets of two kinds of nails and metal wire. Cash-based programs have also been implemented for families who lost their homes and families hosting them. Embedded in this initiative is the Build Back Better and Disaster Risk Reduction Principle orientation for families.

Young couple Joseph and Maricris are among the families who received shelter assistance in Albay. Their family was left with just a cement flooring and a wooden column. Joseph built a makeshift house but was still afraid for their safety, especially his one-year old child, Ella Joyce. “We will use these shelter materials to build a stronger home. This will keep us safe and it will help our children cope,” Maricris said.

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