Breastfeeding Myths Debunked

Know what’s real and what’s not so you can give #BreastmilkForTheBest.

There’s a sea of breastfeeding information on the internet and it’s important to know what’s real and what’s not. Learn more breastfeeding facts to be able to fully understand this journey as a mother, professional, and as a woman. On top of everything, knowledge empowers you to breastfeed the best way you can. Read these common myths and straighten out the facts.

There’s a sea of breastfeeding information on the internet and it’s important to know what’s real and what’s not. Learn more breastfeeding facts to be able to fully understand this journey as a mother, professional, and as a woman. On top of everything, knowledge empowers you to breastfeed the best way you can. Read these common myths and straighten out the facts.MYTH 1: If you have small breasts, you won’t produce enough milk to feed your baby.

Breast size doesn’t matter when it comes to milk production. Keep in mind that the more you nurse, the more you produce milk. This is known as the best way to increase milk supply as latching stimulates prolactin—the hormone that stimulates the mammary glands to produce breastmilk. Feeling frustrated about how you perceive the amount of milk you have right now? Just keep going and know that the amount of milk you are providing is sufficient to meet your baby’s needs.

MYTH 2: You need to nurse every two hours to make sure your baby gets to eat enough every day.

There are no eating patterns when it comes to infants. The most important thing is to feed on demand. This means that you need to feed your child when he or she shows signs of hunger.

MYTH 3: Moms should stop breastfeeding when the baby reaches six months.

According to The World Health Organization, mothers are recommended to exclusively breastfeed their babies up to six months.  At 6 months, you may gradually introduce them to proper solid foods, but it is important to support their diet with continuous breastfeeding. With complimentary feeding, you can provide your child with iron, zinc, vitamins B and D. Although these are all important for your baby, breastmilk can still provide significant amount of nutrients, such as protein, vitamin C, A, and B12. Make sure to provide complete nutrients with complimentary feeding and breastfeeding.

MYTH 4: Breastfeeding is a reliable form of birth control.

The duration when lactation suppresses your menstruation and ovulation is called lactation amenorrhea. The average time for a woman to completely adjust to her normal ovulation is different from other moms. Exclusive breastfeeding may delay your ovulation, but it is not 100% reliable to be used as birth control. The best way to avoid pregnancy is to consult your doctor to know the best birth control method for you.

MYTH 5: You have to wash your nipples before you breastfeed.

This is not true. Just cleanse your nipples with water when taking your daily bath. To further protect nipple damage or infection, it’s best to keep them away from harsh soaps, disinfectants, and other beauty products.

Want to know more? Log on to https://mbfp.doh.gov.ph/ for more information.

First Published by Mother-Baby Friendly Philippines / August 2019



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