Campaign launched vs human trafficking

World Vision is working to prevent exploitation and abuse by strengthening protection mechanisms and building resilience of those who are vulnerable especially the women and children.

 

 

Human trafficking remains a serious problem in the Philippines, mostly involving poor women and children who fall prey to human traffickers. 

 

In a bid to alert the public on the signs and risks of human trafficking, various stakeholders are launching the “Signs to Stop Trafficking” project. The launch was held Friday, May 20, at the  Land Transportation Office in Quezon City.

 

An initiative of the International Justice Mission (IJM), in partnership with the Department of Transportation and Communication (DOTC), National Youth Commission (NYC) and World Vision, the campaign seeks to educate the public on the indicators, signs and forms of trafficking and how to report cases through the production and dissemination of posters and stickers about the topic. 

 

Samson Inocencio Jr, Manila Field Office Director for IJM, says there is significant progress in the fight against trafficking, but more needs to be done to ensure traffickers would be held accountable for their crimes.

 

“The Philippines has strong laws against trafficking, but enforcement is just one aspect. We need to empower citizens by giving them the right information on the issue,” Inocencio said.

 

 

World Vision, for its part, is working to prevent exploitation and abuse by strengthening protection mechanisms and building resilience of those who are vulnerable especially the women and children.

 

“Many children and their families are at risk of violence, abuse, and neglect because their environments are marred by poverty, disasters, and the like. We can help empower the vulnerable children and their families by educating them and giving them access to basic rights,” World Vision Executive Director Josaias Dela Cruz said. 

 

“Citizens are not defenseless; they can make a difference in helping build stronger cases against the perpetrators of this crime,” Dela Cruz added.

 

In 2015, World Vision, in partnership with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), launched an Anti-Trafficking in Persons campaign focused in typhoon Haiyan-affected communities.—World Vision/May 24, 2016 

 

 

 
 

 

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